JAPAN AIRLINES FIRST CLASS SAKURA LOUNGE TOKYO (HANEDA): REVIEW

Alliance: Oneworld

Location: Haneda (Tokyo) International Airport, Terminal 1

Lounge Rating: 4.5 Stars

thumbnail_20190925_135449.jpg

For as far as I can remember I’ve always been fascinated and had respect for Japan Airlines (JAL) as an airline. The airline is synonymous with outstanding customer service, strong product offerings and overall elegance. This extends to their lounges which are well presented and immaculate. I was keen to visit the First Class Lounge in Haneda after friends reported on how wonderful their experience was, including a must visit to the Red Suite. Fortunately I had the opportunity to visit the lounge twice on a recent trip. So how did the lounge stack up in terms of First Class lounges like The Pier in HK or the Concorde Lounge in the UK? I checked into the lounge to find out…

Lounge access options

  • Those travelling in JAL First Class
  • JAL Mileage Bank Diamond, Gold and Silver members
  • Oneworld Emerald members travelling on any Oneworld flight in any cabin of service

Lounge location and opening hours

The JAL First Class Lounge is located after security in the International Terminal on level 4. Located across from gate 112, the lounge can be accessed via an elevator or set of escalators leading up from the gate level. Opening hours for the lounge is from 6am – 2am, with only a closure period of four hours in the wee hours of the early morning.

Ambience

thumbnail_20190925_135120.jpg

Upon entering the lounge for the first time you’re greeted by a stunning hallway with gleaming marble floors, Japanese style partitions and artwork. Off the hallway are shower facilities to the left and a phone room and baggage storage to the right. Beyond the hallway are two main seating areas on either side of the dining space, a small business centre, The Red Suite, showers, bathroom, massage area and smoking room. The amount of seating as well as power outlets are generous. The furnishing style is light and elegant, and more importantly very comfortable.

thumbnail_20190925_135532.jpg

Speaking of the Red Suite, this by far was the room that most impressed. In a word stunning. I’ve not come across such a gorgeous room (not even in The Pier in HK) in a lounge before. Located at the back of the lounge, this adults only space offers a more relaxed space for those seeking quiet.

thumbnail_20190925_135501.jpg

The suite, beautifully decorated in mahogany colours and featuring Japan Airlines memorabilia, is broken up into four spaces. A library, play room, seating room and the all important champagne/sake bar (which comprises of a Laurent-Perrier stocked fridge and top notch sake). There’s also a shoe polishing service for those business flyers looking to spruce up before their next meeting. This was my favourite space in the lounge and found myself often returning to fill up on another sake or Laurent Perrier.

thumbnail_20190925_145926.jpg

I didn’t have the opportunity to visit the shower rooms but the restrooms were well appointed with lovely amenities as well as the iconic Japanese Super Toilet or Washlet (Woshuretto) as it’s known, which has all the dazzling and somewhat confusing array of features.

thumbnail_20190925_135637.jpg

Bread and butter (food and drink)

thumbnail_20190925_135201.jpg

The food selection is mainly self-serve, with a chef available during peak times (breakfast and dinner) to create made to order dishes. The selection is extensive but in comparison to other first lounges I have visited it was a tad underwhelming. Some individual items like the sushi selection was delicious and highly recommended but the salads and bread options looked lacklustre and not well presented. The chef was the highlight of the area and at the time of my visit they were serving the original JAL burger which was quite tasty and went down a treat!

thumbnail_20190925_135209.jpg

There are also two self serve drink stations which include liquor, soft drinks, juice, and a beer machine. The selection on offer is decent but nowhere near as impressive as The Red Suite offering.

thumbnail_20190925_135544.jpg

Verdict

thumbnail_20190925_135141.jpg

The JAL First Class Lounge is definitely up there for me in terms of my all time favourites,  mainly due to the x factor of the Red Suite.  I fell in love with its beautiful interior, tranquil ambience and lovely nod to JALs aviation past. As an aviation geek walking around inspecting the memorabilia with Laurent-Perrier glass in hand has easily become one of my favourite airport lounge experiences.

Whilst the lounge isn’t The Pier in Hong Kong (a difficult task to follow), this lounge has easily become one of my favourites alongside the Qantas, Qatar and British Airways First lounges. I will definitely (and hopefully) be back to enjoy this stunning lounge again sometime in the near future.

thumbnail_20190925_150600.jpg

Comments

Have you experienced the JAL First Class Sakura Lounge at Tokyo’s Haneda Airport? Love to hear from you about your time in lounge – did it shine or were you expecting something better?

 

JAL BUSINESS CLASS B737 OSAKA- TOKYO: REVIEW

Flight: JL228, KIX-HND

Loyalty Scheme: JAL Mileage Bank (member of the Oneworld alliance)

Frequency: Multiple daily

Duration:  1.5 hours

thumbnail_20191004_211806.jpg

JAL domestically is known to enjoy one of the best value business class seats in the skies. For just ¥1,000 (~A$10) more than a regular economy ticket , one can enjoy a larger seat with legroom and a cocktail table to work and enjoy a drink. So how does the seat fare in terms of bang for buck? TAT took to the skies to find out on a recent flight between Osaka and Tokyo (Haneda).

The Seat

thumbnail_20191004_210453.jpg

The biggest selling point of this seat is well the seat and the extra space one enjoys with 38 inches compared to the 31 in economy. Also included is a armrest with a cocktail table and extendable leg rest. Configured in an interesting 2-3 layout, the seat feels more premium economy than business but for ¥1,000 more that’s nothing to complain about here.

thumbnail_20191004_210443.jpg

Entertain me

thumbnail_20191004_215424.jpg

Unfortunately there are no individual inflight entertainment options on domestic services, instead passengers are subject to the old school drop down screens. For those who don’t speak Japanese will struggle with the programming offered as there are no captions subtitles for the programs in English. Also on offer is a handful of radio channels which include chart hits as well as classical music options.

The Bread and Butter (food and drink)

thumbnail_20191004_214019.jpg

Don’t expect to see any meals served on JAL domestic flights, instead J passengers are treated to a drinks service. Drinks on offer include the usual soft drink suspects like Coca-Cola, water, green tea (hot or cold), juices and my personal favourite the JAL signature Sky Time drink which possesses a sweet but refreshing kiwi flavour. Considering the lack of food options and the lounge being closed in Osaka when I arrived, I requested a top up of both a Sky Time and beef soup.

It was disappointing that small snacks like pretzels or cheese and crackers were not offered along with the drinks.

Verdict

For ¥1,000 you really cannot complain about the extra room. I suspect the business lite business class was installed to compete with its bullet train competitors. It’s business with no thrills and the service onboard is exactly the same as you would experience in economy. It would have been nice to see some snacks provided to J passengers to enhance the overall flying experience a little. However for a higher return on status and points as well as a lot more leg room the business class seat on JAL is a no brainer purchase. I would fly this seat again!

Comments

Have you experienced flying business on a JAL domestically? Did you love or dislike the flight? Hit up the comments section as I’m keen to hear your thoughts…

thumbnail_20191004_213349.jpg

JAPAN AIRLINES ‘SKY PREMIUM’ 787-800 TOKYO (NARITA) TO SYDNEY: REVIEW

Flight: JL771, Tokyo (Narita) to Sydney (11 June 2018)
Loyalty Scheme: JAL Mileage Bank/ Oneworld
Frequency: Daily
Duration: 7.25pm (+9) ATD: 7.35pm (+9) Delayed 10 mins; STA: 6:10am (+10) ATA: 6.23am (+10) Delayed 13mins

JAL1.jpg

Japan Airlines operates the lowest density 787 Dreamiliner in the world. In fact, the three class configuration of the JAL 787-8 has only 161 seats. That’s comparable to other airlines that have greater than 200 seats on their 787-8s. The seats are split between 38 business suites (Sky Suites), 35 premium economy (Sky Premium) and 88 economy seats (Sky Wider).

I had previously flown the JAL economy seats which frankly feel like premium economy compared to other airlines. Indeed JAL has a 2-4-2 layout in economy, with the only other airline to choose the more spacious configuration being it’s domestic competitor, All Nippon Airlines (ANA). Premium Economy is in a 2-3-2 layout. Business is 2-2-2 layout with each seat having a wall and direct aisle access for privacy. I booked last minute and as economy wasn’t available, I booked the last remaining seat in Premium Economy, hence I was stuck in the dreaded middle seat, 20E.

The Airport

JAL2.JPG

JAL operates out of Terminal 2 at Tokyo Narita Airport (NRT). Terminal 2 is the terminal used by JAL and its oneworld partners (ie. Qantas, Cathay, American, British Airways). Terminal 1 is split between Skyteam and Star Alliance (including home airline ANA) with Terminal 3 dedicated to low cost carriers like Jetstar and Vanilla Air.

Lounges in Terminal 2 include JAL First and Sakura Lounges as well as Cathay Pacific First and Business Lounge, Qantas Business Lounge, Admirals Club, China Airlines Dynasty Lounge and an Emirates Lounge. As a passenger in Premium Economy, I was entitled to use the Sakura Lounge. The lounge is located conveniently immediately after security, sharing the entrance with the First Lounge (to the left) and the Sakura entrance (to the right).

Down the stairs and inside, there is plenty of ample seating along windows, with nice views of the gates from almost anywhere in the lounge. The main floor of the lounge has drink stations and nibbles, with the main dining area one floor up. Here, there was a modest buffet, drinks, tables and plenty of seating for both groups and singles. Also in the lounge were shower rooms. Originally on arriving I was told that a shower would be an hour wait (which was really how long I had in the lounge. Luckily, my buzzer went off about half hour into my visit. This was perfect timing as I’d just finished eating and meant I could shower right before boarding my plane.

The Seat

 

JAL3.jpg

As I previously mentioned, I had booked this flight less than a week out and so by this time, all seats other than middle ones had been assigned. I consider myself lucky enough to even be able to score 20E. The seat itself was wide and offered ample legroom. The seat has a fixed shell meaning you don’t actually recline, but rather your seat slides down and the seat base moves forward. In this position, the seat was fairly comfortable though I did find myself sliding down throughout the night. Each seat has a privacy divider between other seats and this made a comfortable place to rest against with my pillow.

Waiting at my seat were slippers, a thin blanket, pillow and headphones. To be honest, everything was fairly economy grade and the cabin felt more like economy plus rather than business minus. Newspapers were offer prior to doors closing and flight attendants came around with immigration forms for Australia. The seat was comfortable, though having sat in a regular economy seat between New York and Tokyo, I have to say it’s an incremental improvement and I’d be happy in either (a testament to how comfortable their economy seat is).

Entertain me

JAL4.jpg

At the seat are reading lamps, remote or touchscreen controlled IFE screen and small storage spaces beside the seat as well as beside each screen. Power points and USB outlets were also available at each seat.  The screen was large and bright, with the content showing in fairly high definition (though not crystal clear).

Entertainment content was rather good, with a fair number of western films including some quite recent releases. There were a few TV series with a number of episodes of each series though the variety could have been better. In addition there was a decent selection of English music. While adequate, it was certainly not extensive.

Wifi was available on board this aircraft with prices starting at $10.95 USD for 1 hour to $18.96 USD for the entire flight.

The Bread and Butter (food and drink)

JAL5.jpg

Once in the air, flight attendants came around with hot towels which were then followed by drinks and a packet of rice snacks. I chose the JAL Signature Drink which is called ‘Skytime’. It’s a kiwifruit based cordial which was quite refreshing.

Menus had been handed out prior to take off and there were two meal choices available. On tonight’s flight between Japan and Australia, these were either a beef or chicken dish. The Gyudon was a beef bowl done in Sichuan style, accompanied with pumpkin. I chose the chicken dish which was Chicken Kuwayaki, soy-glazed and sautéed accented by yuzu-citrus flavoured chili paste. The main dishes were accompanied with chilled Winter Melon, savoury Okara Soy Pulp with anchovy, fresh salad with dressing, lychee pudding and finished off with Haagen Dazs ice cream (custard pudding flavour). Everything was served on one dish and would have been identical in economy. JAL catering is usually pretty good and this was no exception – basic food but done well.

JAL6.jpg

Roughly 90 minutes prior to landing, I awoke to find myself surrounded by those sitting next to me eating breakfast. One thing I love on JAL is that if you’ve missed a meal service, they’ll actually place a post-it note on your IFE screen which lets you know you’ve missed a meal. I wish more airlines did this! On request, I was given my meal promptly and this consisted of a seven vegetable quiche, pumpkin salad, yoghurt, bread and butter. It was again a solid meal, if not exceptional.

Verdict

JAL7.jpg

JAL’s 787-8 is the lowest density configuration out there in the world. As such it delivers a premium experience. Boarding commences 20-30 minutes prior to departure, which isn’t long for any international flight but it’s simply all part of the experience. No matter which seat you’re in, its comfort all the way. Premium economy had just that extra personal space compared to those found in economy. That said it was incremental rather than leaps and bounds ahead the economy product.

Japanese service as you’d expect is exceptional and polite, with nothing being too much or too difficult. The touches throughout the flight are thoughtful and considered like the rest of Japanese culture, and I found the entire experience relaxed and calm. What more could you ask for on a red-eye flight?


About the writer

26853377_10159979448035061_1168249417_o.jpg

I’m a well travelled 30 something who blames it all on his father (though really, I’ve taken it to the next level). Travelling from a young age and continuing to do so independently from the end of high school, I am happy to step on a plane headed anywhere. Indeed my colleagues at work don’t ask me if I’m going away in holidays, but where I’ll be headed. They don’t even bat an eyelid when I pop down to Melbourne for the weeknight just to see some show that takes my fancy.

All of my travel is self funded. Through a mixture of great fares and frequent flyer points I’ve developed a penchant for sitting at the front of the plane. However let’s be honest; I’ll just about sit anywhere if it means I get to fly somewhere.

 

JAL SAKURA/ ADMIRALS CLUB LOUNGE HONOLULU INTERNATIONAL: REVIEW

Lounge: Sakura/ Admirals Club Lounge (shared)

Alliance: Oneworld

Location: Honolulu International Airport

Lounge Rating: 4/5 Stars

20180129_093056.jpg

Why should the Hawaiian tropical holiday end at the airport? A shared ventured between JAL and AA, the Sakura/ Admirals Club Lounge at Honolulu International Airport is an oasis in the heart of the airport. Overlooking the open air Chinese gardens that give the airport a rather tranquil feel, this is the airport lounge to head to rather than the Qantas lounge on ground level. So how does the lounge stack up? Australian Traveler checked in to find out.

 

Lounge access options

  • Admirals Club members
  • First and Business class passengers (travelling in First or Business on a qualifying international or transcontinental flight marketed and operated by American or Oneworld airline)
  • Oneworld Emerald and Sapphire members (travelling on flights marketed and operated by American or a Oneworld airline)
  • Qualifying AAdvantage Executive Platinum, Platinum Pro and Platinum
  • Admirals Club One-Day Pass customers
  • Citi / AAdvantage Executive Card authorised users

Lounge location & opening hours

20180129_091831.jpg

Finding this lounge can be a little tricky. The best way to locate it is once you have past the central security checkpoint look for the Kona Brewing restaurant. If you have walked past Starbucks you have gone to far. Head up to Level 3 and walk down a long hallway until you reach the lounge with its wooden double doors. The Sakura/ Admirals Club is open daily from 5:30am – 10pm.

 

Ambience

The lounge was empty when I arrived in (surprising considering there were five JAL planes sitting at the terminal as well as a handful of Oneworld partner aircraft).

First impressions were good. Thank goodness the lounge finishing touches were more more like a JAL Sakura Lounge than an Admirals Club. JAL to me has some of the best lounges on the Oneworld alliance and this lounge is a big step up from the traditional American airport lounge. The wrap around design offered a lot of natural light, plenty of seating and break out areas so that noise didn’t carry around.

Wifi worked well enough but tended to be slow at times (a concern considering the lack of people in the lounge).

 

Bread and butter (food and drink)

20180129_090538.jpg

This is where the lounge was a slight let down (based on my previous experiences with a JAL lounge). The lounge offered two self serve food & drink stations. The food range was minimal at best. My flight was in the morning and was expecting a breakfast buffet selection. Instead I found some fruit, a pound cake and some croissants. That was all the lounge offered. There were also some instant noodles available but being a morning flight I was definitely not in the mood for that type of dish.

20180129_090226.jpg

Drinks selection was better with a range of juices (including green tea juice), California and Japanese wines/ beers and Hawaiian coffee. A typical AA lounge would dish out one free drink token and the passenger would foot the rest but here it was self pour and rather generous at that.

20180129_090159.jpg

 

Verdict

 

The lounge is a far better option for Oneworld Emerald and Sapphire members than the Qantas alternative with better views, greater seating capacity and a more refined elegance. The lounge is very JAL influenced than AA and that really helps give the lounge some wow factor visually.

Food was not it’s strongest point and was severely missing a greater selection of offers to please those lounging around for a few hours. On the other hand the drinks selection was strong.

Overall a lovely lounge with some great views of the Chinese gardens. Those wanting tarmac views need not apply.

20180129_090128.jpg

 

Comments

Have you experienced the Sakura/ Admirals Club Lounge in Honolulu? Love to hear from you about your time in lounge – was it outstanding or did the lounge fail to take off on your expectations?